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Posts Tagged ‘Peter Costello’

Malcolm says it’s time for the speculation about Peter Costello’s future to stop because the public want to hear about something else. Shouldn’t he be saying that to someone other than the public? I don’t believe we’re responsible for the stupidity of the political/media discourse.

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Yawn

Civil wars aren’t what they used to be. An obsolete coward arguing for an obsolete policy against an increasingly obsolete “leader”.

And since when do “foreigners” get to declare civil war?

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We all (at least, those of us on teh Left) are going to miss Brendan, but kudos to him for recognising where he stands and deciding it’s not a role worth playing:

One thing I’ll never be is some sort of seat warmer.

For Tip, on the other hand, it seems to be the only role he wants. Bolt seems to think it’s a shrewd move; that Tip should keep his eyes on the top job. But even if you assume a Boltian position on Costello’s talent and historical performance, what it (once again) seems to show about Peter Costello is this – that either through wounded pride or sheer indifference, he is happy to leave his talent on the shelf while his party flounders in opposition.

NB: I note that there are now claims from the Costello camp that the offer was never made. If that were true, then the question becomes who is trying to destabilise Hockey’s position from the outset.

UPDATE: Mad Monk as elder statesman. Interestingly, Tony Abbott sounds most credible when acknowledging his complete ignorance:

“I haven’t asked Peter [Costello], I haven’t asked Malcolm [Turnbull], I have no reason to think any offer was made,” he said.

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Apparently, he can sit on the shelf for a few more years.

P.S. It’s good that we have Peter van Onselen around – both to read the mind of the electorate (“MOST Australians would be feeling more comfortable right now if Peter Costello were still running the economy”), and to counterbalance the evil horde of socialist academics and school teachers who want to indoctrinate our kids.

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Oh, good grief

So this, apparently, is how it goes:

  • In 1994, when he was not Prime Minister, a politician agreed to hand over the reins to his second-in-command during his second term as PM.
  • Once in power, said politician reneged on his agreement – which would have required him to step aside between the 1998 and 2001 elections.
  • The second-in-command, apart from a minor feint from time to time, remained in place and contributed to the perception of a stable and effective Government, while his leader contested three more elections (2001, 2004, 2007), with the final one ending in the defeat of both leader and Government.
  • Fourteen years after the original agreement, and at least seven years after it became clear that said agreement would not be honoured, the second-in-command seeks redress by writing a book in which he details the betrayal he suffered.

Mr Costello – you, sir, are a loser. There is no other way to describe your character. You believed the assurances of an accomplished liar when he told you he would voluntarily let go power – for your own good and for that of your party. And when it became obvious that his self-interest trumped any commitments he had made, you failed to make any meaningful attempt to hold him to account. You stood by as not one, not two, but three opportunities passed by, in a profession where the most fundamental principle is that to gain power, you need to pursue it.

Some might argue that this demonstrates your loyalty to your party – that you put maintaining an effective Government above your own needs. But that possibility has been demolished by your total antipathy in recent months.

It is time to quit. You are not cut out for this business, and you have gone far beyond the point of appearing foolish.

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Ding. Dong.

He’s not the Messiah – he’s a very naughty boy.

ELSEWHERE: Some people still can’t be convinced it’s over.

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Follow up

A request for our political journalists. Instead of spending all of your time speculating about whether Peter Costello plans to stay in politics, whether Malcolm will challenge Brendan for the leadership, and creating your own little melodramas, can you follow up on this sort of statement?

But the former treasurer says the policies of the Rudd Government are largely to blame for Australia’s economic plight

“I think some big mistakes have been made in Australia,” he said.

“I don’t think it’s a coincidence [that] after the accumulation of wealth like we’d never seen before, 10-11 per cent household wealth growth, year after year, suddenly it went backwards,” he said.

Perhaps ask the elusive little genius something along the lines of:

  • “Mr Costello, you have said that some big mistakes have been made in managing the Australian economy. What are those mistakes?”
  • “You spoke about the severe problems in the American economy resulting from the subprime lending crisis. Isn’t it true that this crisis has had implications for many Australian institutions, and hasn’t it contributed to the downturn in the Australian economy?”
  • “What, precisely, would you have done differently from the Rudd Government in managing the economy over the past nine months?”

In short, could you actually ask a question that requires him to back up his pathetic attempts at sniping from the sidelines? It would seem to me that this is much more important than trying to “Gotcha!” him by asking, “Will you miss federal politics?”

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